Help on Yelp!

June 7th, 2011 04:59pm CDT by Becky O

by Becky O.

I started off the day by gathering some information about our client Dr. Tod Davis and. I made a couple of contacts and will be compiling the information into a press kit to release later this week.

The remainder of my day was focused on Yelp.com. Connor’s Pest Protection has a profile on Yelp and they had some questions about the usefulness of advertising on Yelp’s site. After reading through pages and pages of material about Yelp and it’s policies, I was able to understand the site. Any reader can post a comment, as long as they have created a free account. Comments are filtered by Yelp based not on content, but on how many times the particular user has commented on businesses in the past. New users don’t necessarily get their comments posted right away.

In continuing our research of Yelp, Scot spoke with a salesman at Yelp and I sat in on the call. I don’t think that I’ve ever heard an entire sales pitch before. The salesman would explain how advertising on Yelp works and would barely pause for Scot to ask a question. As any salesman would do, he danced around the answers to the questions and repeated what he had previously said. It was difficult to get the information we desired. It turns out that to advertise on Yelp, you are locked in to a one year agreement with a $1,000 early termination fee. For 600 impressions per month, you pay $350 per month.

Throughout the sales call, it was interesting to see that every time we typed in key words for a search on Yelp, as instructed by the salesman, Connor’s Pest Protection came up first in the search. This was all without any advertising on the page. Is it worth the money when Connor’s is already number one in the search? I’m not sure, I’m just the intern, but it goes to show that our SEO work with Connor’s is making a difference.





1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading ... Loading ...

One Response to “ Help on Yelp! ”

  1. Tamara says:

    It always amazes me when people (salespeople) don’t want to answer questions directly. Maybe I’m too optimistic, but it would seem that if you can’t honestly sell something, why sell it at all? I guess I don’t understand the world of sales, but I’m quite sure that talking in circles isn’t a good way to sell.